Runner’s Knee; Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

ShoreOrtho Sports Performance & Injury Prevention Tips

A monthly series
presented by:

Damon A. Greene, MD
Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon
Shore Orthopaedic University Associates
July 2020


Runner’s Knee

Patellofemoral pain syndrome also called Runners knee refers to pain under and around your kneecap.  Runner’s knee is a term that can describe many medical conditions such as anterior knee pain syndrome, patellofemoral malalignment, and chondromalacia patella. All of these conditions can cause pain around the anterior portion of the knee. Runner’s knee is a common complaint among many athletes from soccer players to jumpers to skiers and of course runners.



Causes

Runner’s knee can happen for many reasons.  From poor alignment of the kneecap, complete or partial dislocation, overuse, tight or weak thigh muscles, flat feet, direct trauma to the knee.  Patellofemoral pain often comes from the softening of the cartilage that lines the underside of the kneecap. The pain can also arise from the strained ligaments and tendons around the knee.
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Dr. Greene discusses a common surfing injury

ShoreOrtho Sports Performance
& Injury Prevention Tips


A monthly
series
presented by:
Damon A. Greene, MD
Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon
Shore Orthopaedic University Associates

October 2019

It’s finally fall and time for surfing season especially here in South Jersey.

So let’s discuss a surfing injury that commonly gets overlooked the “Hips Flexors”. When we are surfing the front foot and hip rotate forward this puts stress across the spine, hip, knees and even ankles. The back foot turns out because the gluteal muscles (buttock muscles) contract and shorten rotating the back hip out. This means that unless we stretch and strengthen to our hip flexors, we are setting ourselves up for other injuries and limiting our ability to enjoy the waves. One stretch that I like is called the Lizard. This stretch predominately targets the hip flexors but also targets the groin and glutes. Draw one foot to the outside of your arms and place both hands flat on the ground. Bring your forearms to the floor or as far as your body allows. Your back leg stays off the ground. Hold the stretch for approximately 30 seconds and repeat.