Dr. Greene explains Labral Tears diagnosis & treatment options

ShoreOrtho Sports Performance & Injury Prevention Tips

A Monthly Blog Series
presented by:

Damon A. Greene, MD
Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon
Shore Orthopaedic University Associates
October 2020

LABRAL TEARS
ANATOMY
The hip acts as foundation and pivot point for the entire body joining the upper and lower halves. It is just as important for walking as it is for core strength and supporting the upper body.

The hip is a ball and socket joint. The head of the ball (femoral head) fits into the socket (the acetabulum). If you imagine a cup the labrum is a thick ring of cartilaginous tissue that surrounds the top of the cup. The labrum has many functions from shock absorber but is two main functions are to confer increased stability to the cup and provide semi airtight seal that helps to keep the synovial fluid in the joint which provides lubrication between the femoral head and acetabulum. The labrum has also been shown to have a collection of nerves and sensory organs which can signal pain if the labrum is damaged. The blood supply to the labrum is very limited which unfortunately limits its ability to heal.

SYMPTOMS
Labral tears are difficult to diagnose, partially because of the many muscles and other structures that are near the hip joint. They are often misdiagnosed as common groin strains and it is not uncommon for the diagnosis to be missed for many months after the labrum is torn

Labral tears are common in athletes and occur when the collagen rips. There are many symptoms of a labral tear. The main symptoms are hip and groin pain. However other symptoms include:

  1. Pain
  2. “Catching” feeling in the hip
  3. Decreased strength
  4. Decreased range of motion
  5. Locking of the hip
  6. Stiffness

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Congratulations Dr. Fox on being selected as a Top Podiatrist in NJ!

SELECT SURGEONS BONE & JOINT

Best in New Jersey 

Announcing an elite grouping of the state’s top Orthopedic Surgeons, Neurosurgeons, Plastic Surgeons and Podiatrists across 13 procedure categories. This distinction is based on a number of criteria, including experience, qualifications, surgical volume, results and reputation. Only the top doctors in each category are named to the Select Surgeons Bone & Joint list. Many of the surgeons on this list perform other procedures in addition to those for which they have been recognized.

Ira M. Fox, DPM
Podiatric Surgeon
Shore Orthopaedic University Associates


Specializing in:
Reconstructive and Traumatic Foot and Ankle Surgery, Ankle Joint Replacement

Selection Methodology—Bone & Joint Surgeons
By New Jersey Monthly | August 8, 2019

Select Surgeons takes a 360-degree look at New Jersey’s bone and joint surgeons, reviewing 9 criteria across 13 procedure categories to arrive at the most comprehensive evaluation of leading bone and joint surgeons in the state. Leflein Associates (add link), a locally owned research firm in Ringwood, NJ, was commissioned to conduct the survey. Research was conducted between November 2019 and April 2020.

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Positive long-term outcome because of the expertise of Dr. Marczyk!

Surgeon Dr. Marczyk is amazing!

He is professional and was incredible with my 11 year-old son. He operated on my son’s hand after a knife accident, repaired tendons and restored full function. Spent the time to answer my sons questions and made him feel calm before surgery.

The first question people asked us when they found out about my sons injury was, “Did you go to Philly?”. No need to got to Philly for specialty surgeons, as we have Dr. Marczyk right here at Shore Orthopedics.

My son has a whole lifetime ahead of him, and having a hand that would properly function and grip was important for his future quality of life. Positive long-term outcome for my son was because of the expertise of Dr. Marczyk. Shore Orthopedics jumped through hoops to get my son into surgery quickly, at a location he does not typically perform surgery to accommodate us, and his entire team was professional. Follow-up services were just as exceptional as Dr. Marczyk’s initial surgical care. Highly recommended!

Runner’s Knee; Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

ShoreOrtho Sports Performance & Injury Prevention Tips

A monthly series
presented by:

Damon A. Greene, MD
Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon
Shore Orthopaedic University Associates
July 2020


Runner’s Knee

Patellofemoral pain syndrome also called Runners knee refers to pain under and around your kneecap.  Runner’s knee is a term that can describe many medical conditions such as anterior knee pain syndrome, patellofemoral malalignment, and chondromalacia patella. All of these conditions can cause pain around the anterior portion of the knee. Runner’s knee is a common complaint among many athletes from soccer players to jumpers to skiers and of course runners.



Causes

Runner’s knee can happen for many reasons.  From poor alignment of the kneecap, complete or partial dislocation, overuse, tight or weak thigh muscles, flat feet, direct trauma to the knee.  Patellofemoral pain often comes from the softening of the cartilage that lines the underside of the kneecap. The pain can also arise from the strained ligaments and tendons around the knee.
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