Hip replacements move to outpatient-style model

Hip and knee replacements have come a long way in Dr. Stephen Zabinski’s career as an orthopedic surgeon.

But one advancement is something unheard of 20 years ago – patients getting hip replacements in an ambulatory surgical center in the morning and returning home early in the afternoon.

This approach avoids possible days-long recoveries in a hospital and rehabilitation center, ultimately making it more cost effective for health care reform, he said.

Zabinski, vice president of Shore Orthopaedic University Associates, has performed these types of surgeries for more than three years and has been doing them at the Jersey Shore Ambulatory Surgical Center in Somers Point for about six months on certain patients.

“It really achieves all the goals we want to provide better care to patients in a safe way that’s more cost effective,” said Zabinski, who is the director of the Division of Orthopedic Surgery at Shore Medical Center and President of the Jersey Shore Ambulatory Surgical Center.

The hip replacements use a “direct anterior approach” that avoids cutting muscles to put the hip implant in, he said.

The procedure still cuts bone and puts in implants, but avoiding slicing muscles gives patients less pain and more mobility at home, he said.

“A lot of these hip patients because you’re staying away from these muscles, you don’t need crutches or a walker, you can just use a cane,” he said.

Knee replacements, likewise, do not cut the quadriceps muscle, but instead involve sliding the muscle over.

Performed outside of the hospital, the surgeries involve several hours of recovery, a physical therapist’s help at the surgical center and usually a return home by 2 p.m.

Visiting nurses and physical therapists then return to the home for about a week before patients can get treatment at outpatient therapy.

Zabinski said this home-based approach is suitable for about 20 percent to 25 percent of patients.

It is not based necessarily on age, but physical health, muscular build, medical history and the ability of patients to get help from loved ones at home, he said.

He said the approach meshes with where healthcare reform in going in the U.S.

“It keeps me on the curve if not slightly ahead of it,” he said.

A recent study by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons indicates about 2 percent of Americans are living with artificial joints.

The numbers of these surgeries are anticipated to grow significantly over the years. A study in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery found increasing total knee replacements strongly tied to obesity trends in the U.S., particularly with younger patients.

 

https://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/wellness/senior_health/hip-replacements-move-to-outpatient-style-model/article_f7de444c-003d-5967-8e98-6628f92ea80c.html

Shore Orthopaedic Lecture Series | Evening Session


Greate Bay Racquet & Fitness in cooperation with

Shore Orthopaedic University Associates
presents a

Community Orthopaedic Lecture Series

Thursday April 12, 2018
6:30-7:30pm

Evening Session 
An opportunity to “Ask The Expert”

Shoulder Pain: “When to see a Doctor”
George C. Alber, MD, Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon

Meniscal Tears
Damon A. Greene, MD, Orthopaedic Surgeon, Fellowship Trained Sports Medicine

What is (PRP) Platelet Rich Plasma Therapy?
Charles N. Krome, DO, Fellowship Trained Sports Medicine

This is a FREE event, open to the community
Registration Required – ortho2.eventbrite.com 

Limited Seating
Refreshments Served

For more information contact:
Greate Bay Racquet & Fitness – 609-926-9550 or
Shore Orthopaedic – 609-927-1991 ext. 171

Orthopaedic Surgeon Dr. Greene, Offers Advice on Shoulder Pain

 

Damon A. Greene, MD
Shore Orthopaedic University Associates

Dr. Greene, is an orthopedic surgeon, who is fellowship-trained in sports medicine, arthroscopy and cartilage surgery. He specializes in acute and chronic ligament, tendon and cartilage injuries to all major joints, primarily the shoulders, elbows, knees and hips.

He grew up just outside of Baltimore playing sports such as soccer, baseball and lacrosse. As a result, he suffered from multiple sports injuries, he diligently worked with athletic trainers and became involved with his own physical therapy. From this stemmed his passion for sports medicine.

Dr. Greene attended the University of Maryland and obtained his medical degree from New York Medical College. He completed his orthopedic surgical residency and training at SUNY Downstate in Brooklyn, where he spent an extra year concentrating on the diagnosis and treatment of athletic injuries. He then completed a Sports Medicine Fellowship at the prestigious Ochsner Sports Medicine Institute in New Orleans, where he worked with professional sports teams including the New Orleans Saints and the New Orleans Pelicans.

His love of the outdoors drew him to the Jersey Shore, where he enjoys surfing, sailing and running on the boardwalk. He is excited to become involved with the community and grow roots here. In his downtime, he has started covering Middle Township football games and Stockton basketball games, working with the trainers and coaches to evaluate athletic injuries on the spot.

Dr. Greene offers advice on an issue he frequently treats: Shoulder Pain.

A common cause of shoulder pain is poor posture, especially for those who work in an office. When you sit at a computer and type all day, your shoulders tend to roll forward. If you often get an achy feeling in your back, arms, shoulders or neck, Dr. Greene suggests pinching your shoulder blades once a day for 10 minutes. This will train your shoulder blades where they should be to properly support your shoulders. If you feel numbness or tingling from your neck to your fingertips, the issue could be a nerve root and it’s time to see a doctor.

Foot & Ankle Surgeon, Dr. Lai offers advice on Ankle Sprains

Ted C. Lai, DPM
Shore Orthopaedic University Associates


 Advice on Ankle Sprains

While in 80 percent of ankle sprains the ligament heals with a brace, rest, ice, compression and elevation, in 20 percent of ankle sprains the ligament does not heal in the correct anatomical position. This happens if the injury is more severe with complete rupture of the ligament and/or you don’t allow it to heal correctly. In this situation, the acute ankle sprain can develop into chronic lateral ankle instability and predisposes other structures to further injuries such as tendonitis and cartilage damage. At that point, with the triad of injuries, surgical repair many times is necessary. With today’s advanced surgical techniques and innovative technologies, recovery time has significantly improved and allows you to get back on your feet earlier. Surgery may be avoided completely by seeing a doctor as soon as the sprain occurs especially if there is swelling, bruising, pain, and difficulty with walking. To avoid ankle sprains, proper footwear is important. Stay away from flimsy shoes and wear rigid-soled sneakers with arch supports. Be cautious when walking or running on uneven terrain such as the beach, curbs, or steps.

Dr. Lai is a fellowship-trained foot and ankle surgeon, specializing in fractures, trauma, reconstructive surgery, ligament and tendon repair, and deformity correction of the foot and ankle. He is board qualified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery and an associate member of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons.