Better Golf through fitness: Shore Orthopaedic’s Physical Therapist LJ Georgetti, DPT

“Its all In The Hips” By Larry Justin “LJ” Georgetti, DPT

Any aging golfer can count on one of his/her friend’s bailing on an eight o-clock tee time due to “back pain”. Range of motion and strength of the whole body are essential when building a strong foundation to a healthy golf swing. I believe that the abnormalities in swing mechanics and mobility limitations in the hips/spine will cause restrictions in how one develops force in the golf swing.  These abnormalities over time will result in dysfunction and eventually pain.

The golf swing has many variables, as does the human body. However, one thing remains consistent throughout all golf swings: energy must be delivered to a stationary golf ball in order to move it a desired distance. In the most efficient swings, energy is generated by the lower extremities via the ground. How this energy is gained, stored and eventually transmitted are exactly where the variables begin to differentiate between professional and recreational golfers. A golfer utilizes his/her lower extremity to generate force through the ground and eventually to the ball at impact. It is worth noting that the musculature surrounding the hips, known as the “glutes”, are the strongest in the body. These are the ones responsible for getting us up out of a chair and keeping us erect when walking. Problems arise when we do not train and utilize these muscles appropriately. As my colleague, Chris Hanson, previously discussed, the hip and the lumbar spine are closely related in the golf swing. If dysfunction arises in one, the other will suffer.

Continue reading

Hip Mobility and the Golf Swing

By Christopher C. Hanson, PT, MPT, DMT, OCS, FAAOMPT

 

Most golfers are weekend warriors and if there is extra time in anyone’s schedule for golf activities, more times than not this is allocated to swing training.  As the last few articles have discussed, physical fitness is equally important.  In order to have a world class swing, the function of one’s musculoskeletal system also needs to be equipped. Golf is a sport that requires strength, power, coordination and mobility; no one of these is more important than the other. This weekly dive into the physical care of a golfer’s body will discuss the importance of hip mobility and stability in all golfers.

In the golf community the importance of spinal mobility and strength is well documented. There have been numerous social media campaigns since the start of this golf season showing new creative ways to improve spinal mobility and strength.  However, absent from these posts have been ways to improve hip strength and mobility; negating altogether the connection between the hip and the spine.

The hip and the spine are intricately related. If one has movement issues in one area, it can transmit increased forces along the kinetic (movement) chain.  In the presence of hip mobility issues the body increases motion in other joints.  The body is almost too good at this compensation and creating more (too much) movement in order to allow someone to function in a way that seems correct.  In the presence of limited hip mobility there may be an excessive forces through the lumbar spine. This can happen at different points in the swing.  Limited hip mobility can create issues in the back swing, during the initiation of swing and during the follow through. This also relates to other sporting activities as well.

Continue reading

My Ankle Story…

Patient: John Sugden
Physician: Ted C. Lai, DPM

Lai-JohnI had a bad ankle and hadn’t been able to walk
without it giving out for the last 15 years, until I met Dr. Lai!

I had been to a couple of doctors, but never got an answer I was comfortable with. They talked about bone grafts and ankle replacement or just plain fusing it. So, I continued to wrap it and wear high boots that laced up into the calf so I could walk.

I went to see Dr. Lai and told my wife, the first time he says six months on crutches, I am leaving. I told him what I had been through up to this point and he said he has new procedures that can be done and if the dead bone was my only problem I would be back on my feet in no time. I had torn all of the tendons and ligaments in the ankle as well as fracturing it at some point. He said he would fix the dead bone problem minimally invasively and then take the tendons and ligaments apart to weave them back together the way they belonged. He told me I would be non-weight bearing for 6-8 weeks on crutches and then in a boot for four months. This was a lot better than being non-weight bearing for a year, so I said let’s do it.

Continue reading

Congratulations to our Shore Ortho Physical Therapy clinical staff members!!!

(Left to Right) Grady Brozyna (Shore Ortho PT, Somers Point), Chris Hanson (Shore Ortho PT, CMCH), Matthew Redmond (NovaCare Rehabilitation Marmora) and  Doug Dannehower (Shore Ortho PT, Somers Point)

Congratulations are in order for a few of our Shore Ortho Physical Therapy clinical staff members.  This past weekend  finished a long clinical journey.  In year one of their journey, they became Certified Orthopedic Manual Therapists (COMT).  In year two, they completed their Residency Training.  This past weekend, they completed the last portion of their journey and became Fellowship Trained.  They are now Fellows of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists (FAAOMPT).

 

 

 

Dizziness: Increased Risk for Fractures

Dizziness is a common problem that can affect a person at any age. There are many reasons for dizziness, some more serious than others. One common, easily treatable cause of transient dizziness is called “benign paroxysmal positional vertigo,” or BPPV. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo causes dizziness related to head movement and position and is due to a problem in the inner ear. Dizziness can negatively affect one’s quality of life and is associated with an increased risk of falls. This may be especially problematic for older people, who have a greater chance of falling and breaking bones. Recovering from a fracture can be particularly difficult for someone who is elderly.

Fracture

Continue reading