Hip replacements move to outpatient-style model

Hip and knee replacements have come a long way in Dr. Stephen Zabinski’s career as an orthopedic surgeon.

But one advancement is something unheard of 20 years ago – patients getting hip replacements in an ambulatory surgical center in the morning and returning home early in the afternoon.

This approach avoids possible days-long recoveries in a hospital and rehabilitation center, ultimately making it more cost effective for health care reform, he said.

Zabinski, vice president of Shore Orthopaedic University Associates, has performed these types of surgeries for more than three years and has been doing them at the Jersey Shore Ambulatory Surgical Center in Somers Point for about six months on certain patients.

“It really achieves all the goals we want to provide better care to patients in a safe way that’s more cost effective,” said Zabinski, who is the director of the Division of Orthopedic Surgery at Shore Medical Center and President of the Jersey Shore Ambulatory Surgical Center.

The hip replacements use a “direct anterior approach” that avoids cutting muscles to put the hip implant in, he said.

The procedure still cuts bone and puts in implants, but avoiding slicing muscles gives patients less pain and more mobility at home, he said.

“A lot of these hip patients because you’re staying away from these muscles, you don’t need crutches or a walker, you can just use a cane,” he said.

Knee replacements, likewise, do not cut the quadriceps muscle, but instead involve sliding the muscle over.

Performed outside of the hospital, the surgeries involve several hours of recovery, a physical therapist’s help at the surgical center and usually a return home by 2 p.m.

Visiting nurses and physical therapists then return to the home for about a week before patients can get treatment at outpatient therapy.

Zabinski said this home-based approach is suitable for about 20 percent to 25 percent of patients.

It is not based necessarily on age, but physical health, muscular build, medical history and the ability of patients to get help from loved ones at home, he said.

He said the approach meshes with where healthcare reform in going in the U.S.

“It keeps me on the curve if not slightly ahead of it,” he said.

A recent study by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons indicates about 2 percent of Americans are living with artificial joints.

The numbers of these surgeries are anticipated to grow significantly over the years. A study in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery found increasing total knee replacements strongly tied to obesity trends in the U.S., particularly with younger patients.

 

https://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/wellness/senior_health/hip-replacements-move-to-outpatient-style-model/article_f7de444c-003d-5967-8e98-6628f92ea80c.html

Joint Pain? Consider Stem Cell Therapy


Shore Orthopaedic University Associates
is pleased to offer the latest treatment in
Regenerative Orthopaedic Medicine… Stem Cell Therapy

Stem cells are undifferentiated cells that can differentiate into specialized cells that are capable of playing a role in helping the body repair and rejuvenate itself.   They can change themselves into cells such as chondrocytes capable of cartilage repair, myocytes which are capable of muscle repair, tenocytes which are capable of tendon repair, as well as cells capable of bone and even nerve repair.  Stem cells can come from many different sources in our own bodies including, blood, fat, bone marrow, dental pulp, as well as many other tissues.  Stem cells can also come from sources outside our own bodies including embryonic tissue, amniotic tissue, and umbilical cord blood. At Shore Orthopaedics, Dr. Charles Krome (who has been performing regenerative medicine procedures since 2008) uses stem cells derived from the umbilical cord blood donated from healthy mothers, along with a patient’s own platelet rich plasma, to treat a variety of orthopaedic/sports medicine conditions including osteoarthritis of the knee, hip, shoulder, ankle, etc., rotator cuff tears, tennis elbow and other tendonopathies of the body, plantar fasciitis, meniscal and ligament injuries, as well as many other musculoskeletal conditions.

There is no surgery or invasive procedures done to the patient. No bone marrow aspiration. No liposuction. The cells are ordered direct from a tissue bank which screens the donated cord blood for diseases and the cells come specifically for each patient’s procedure the morning of the stem cell injection.  The cells are thawed and mixed with the patient’s own platelet rich plasma to maximize healing capability, then injected directly into the treatment area.  Most injections are done under ultrasound guidance to ensure appropriate delivery into the joint being treated.  There is no HLA matching which means the cells will not illicit an immune response from the patient.  The potential for healing and improved quality of life is very high with umbilical cord derived stem cells with minimal risks to the patient.

To see if you are a candidate for this exciting regenerative therapy, please schedule a consultation with
Dr. Charles Krome to discuss your therapeutic options.

Appointments available in our Somers Point, Galloway and Cape May Court House offices.

SHOREORTHODOCS.COM
609.927.1991

Cape May County Herald

 

My family and I will be FOREVER grateful to Dr. Islinger and SHORE ORTHO!

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Dr. Islinger made me feel like a CHAMP again!  But, The true champion here is Dr. Islinger.

My story begins with trauma 18 months ago when I was struck by an SUV while riding my triathlon bike, resulting with multiple injuries and a long road to recovery. I spent Six days in the A. C. Trauma hospital and had Surgery on my right leg/knee by the on-call trauma surgeon. It was very clear to me that I needed to fire the doctor who performed my surgery and the non-caring Rothman Institute as soon as possible. My family and I will be FOREVER grateful to Dr. Islinger and SHORE ORTHO who took superior care of me.

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Shoulder Pain Keeping You Up at Night?

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Gene J. DeMorat, MD

The shoulder joint is capable of tremendous mobility to assist in the essential activities of everyday life. It relies upon a group of muscles, known as the rotator cuff, to ensure its function for overhead and lifting activities.

Unfortunately, the rotator cuff is commonly associated with injury. Such injuries may occur from a simple fall onto the shoulder or even from the accumulation of simple lifting events over our lifetime.

The most common symptoms are pain, weakness, and motion loss. Symptoms may develop suddenly or in a gradual onset. Symptoms that persist beyond a two week period, without signs of relief, should be evaluated by an orthopaedic surgeon.

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Sports Medicine Starts At Home For John R. McCloskey, MD

Cecilia Dougherty McCloskey

Cecilia Dougherty McCloskey

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Dr. McCloskey has firsthand experience working with athletes. His wife Cecilia is a master swimmer recently setting NATIONAL AND WORLD RECORD WINS at the U.S. Masters Swimming 2015 Summer National Championship. Cecilia was NATIONAL CHAMPION in 4 Individual events and set WORLD RECORDS in the 50, 100, and 200 Backstroke events. Her 2nd Place finish in the 200IM was also under the World Record. And she also swam on a National Champion Women’s 200 Free Relay.

Swimming and fitness have always been part of Cecilia’s life. She started swimming at a very young age and has been competing on a national level since the age of fourteen. Cecilia’s talents allowed her to excel as a NCAA Division 1 swimmer and the captain of her team at West Chester State University winning the championship her senior year. She was also a competitor in the 1967 Pan Am Games and a 1968 Olympic Trials finalist.
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