Dr. Greene discusses “UCL TEARS” (Tommy John Procedure)

ShoreOrtho Sports Performance
& Injury Prevention Tips


A monthly
series
presented by:
Damon A. Greene, MD
Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon
Shore Orthopaedic University Associates

March 2020

UCL TEARS (Tommy John Procedure)

Baseball season is right around the corner. So let’s take a few minutes and talk UCL (Ulnar Collateral Ligament) injuries.

UCL injuries are very common for throwing athletes and those that use their upper extremity frequently. There are two types of injuries acute and chronic. An acute injury can occur if too much stress is put on the elbow in one single incident which can cause the ligament to tear. A chronic injury typically occurs from repeated stress on the ligament. This causes the ligament to be stretched, frayed or torn.  The repetitive motion of throwing can cause small micro tears in the ligament which can result in rupture of the ligament. While everyone’s symptoms are different, patients who sustain a UCL injury will experience elbow pain, numbness, and swelling. Elbow instability will also occur. Some patients suffering from an elbow ligament injury may have trouble gripping items with their hands. Athletes will experience a loss of control with throwing and will not be able to complete a throw at full speed or strength. With an acute UCL injury there is typically a pop or tearing sound.

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Dr. Greene discusses “Preventing Winter Injuries”

ShoreOrtho Sports Performance
& Injury Prevention Tips


A monthly
series
presented by:
Damon A. Greene, MD
Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon
Shore Orthopaedic University Associates

January 2020

Winter injuries are very common, and every year thousands of people suffer from winter injuries. So let’s discuss ways we can help prevent these injuries.

Walking

Simple walking can become a dangerous activity during winter weather. Hidden ice patches, precipitation, snowbanks can lead to slips stumbles and falls. Some tips to prevent these injuries include

  1. Wear footwear with non-slip soles.
  2. Walk slowly, slide your feet, and avoid turning sharply when on ice, puddles, or other slippery surfaces. Hold onto railings when using outdoor stairways. If encountering these slippery surfaces use your arms to balance yourself.
  3. Wipe your feet when entering a building so that your wet soles won’t cause you to slip.
  4. If you do slip or start to fall, bend your knees and elbows and using your legs and arms to absorb the fall.

Shoveling

Shoveling is a strenuous activity.  One can overexert themselves and end up with exhaustion or even heart strain. However, the most common issues are muscular related with strains to low back shoulders. To reduce your risk, you should:

  1. Pace yourself and take frequent breaks.
  2. Listen to your body and stop immediately if you become short of breath, start sweating heavily, or experience chest pains.
  3. Proper lifting technique. Try to push the snow instead of lifting it. If you cannot push the snow and have to lift it, squat with your legs apart, knees bent, and back straight. Lift with your legs. Do not bend at the waist. Scoop small amounts of snow into the shovel and walk to where you want to dump it.
  4. Safe technique. Do not throw the snow over your shoulder or to the side. This requires a twisting motion that stresses your back. Likewise holding a shovelful of snow with your arms outstretched puts too much weight on your spine.

Dr. Greene is a Sports Medicine Fellowship-Trained, Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon.
He specializes in; acute and chronic ligament, tendon, or cartilage injuries to all major joints; primarily shoulders, elbows, knees and hips. He treats fractures surgically when necessary, but performs casting, bracing, and other non-operative treatments such as specialized injection therapies.

 

Dr. Greene discusses “Surfers Shoulder”

ShoreOrtho Sports Performance
& Injury Prevention Tips


A monthly
series
presented by:
Damon A. Greene, MD
Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon
Shore Orthopaedic University Associates

November 2019

“Surfers Shoulder” also known as Shoulder Impingement is a common overuse injury of the shoulder.

When we paddle we use the front of our shoulder the pectoralis major, pectoralis minor and anterior aspect of our deltoid. We also strengthen shoulder elevators the trapezuim and levator scapula among others. This causes a net upward and anterior directed force across our shoulder. This then leads to impingement of the rotator cuff on the acromion (the roof of the shoulder).  Intern the tissue around the rotator cuff becomes inflamed which then will lead to bursitis.

If left unaddressed scar tissue can form in the capsule causing a loss of a range of motion and chronic shoulder pain and ultimately rotator cuff tears. In order to prevent this proper paddling technique is crucial. Secondly learning to activate the posterior and inferior aspects of our shoulders while preforming activities will help keep us paddling stronger and out of pain.

While there are many different exercises that can achieve this, one of my favorites is an exercise called Wall Angels. 


To begin, plant yourself against a nice, roomy wall space. Elbows start at a 90 degree bend, with the elbows parallel to the ground. Hips, spine, shoulder blades…all against the wall! To get to the stretch-and-strengthen part – although you might already feel some tension while holding the arms at 90 degrees – begin to straighten the arms directly overhead, trying to at least keep the elbows sliding up against the wall. As you get stronger and looser, maybe the forearms and back of the hands will be able to stay in contact with the wall, as well.

 

Dr. Greene is a Sports Medicine Fellowship-Trained, Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon.
He specializes in; acute and chronic ligament, tendon, or cartilage injuries to all major joints; primarily shoulders, elbows, knees and hips. He treats fractures surgically when necessary, but performs casting, bracing, and other non-operative treatments such as specialized injection therapies.

 

Dr. Greene discusses a common surfing injury

ShoreOrtho Sports Performance
& Injury Prevention Tips


A monthly
series
presented by:
Damon A. Greene, MD
Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon
Shore Orthopaedic University Associates

October 2019

It’s finally fall and time for surfing season especially here in South Jersey.

So let’s discuss a surfing injury that commonly gets overlooked the “Hips Flexors”. When we are surfing the front foot and hip rotate forward this puts stress across the spine, hip, knees and even ankles. The back foot turns out because the gluteal muscles (buttock muscles) contract and shorten rotating the back hip out. This means that unless we stretch and strengthen to our hip flexors, we are setting ourselves up for other injuries and limiting our ability to enjoy the waves. One stretch that I like is called the Lizard. This stretch predominately targets the hip flexors but also targets the groin and glutes. Draw one foot to the outside of your arms and place both hands flat on the ground. Bring your forearms to the floor or as far as your body allows. Your back leg stays off the ground. Hold the stretch for approximately 30 seconds and repeat.

 

 

 

Dr. Dalzell Explains Treatment and Prevention of the “Most Common Golf Injuries”

MOST COMMON GOLF INJURIES


Frederick G. Dalzell, MD
Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon

Fractured ribs, herniated discs, injured wrist and knees, we’re not talking the Eagles injury report, but rather some of the injuries suffered on the PGA tour! Hard to believe that what’s been described as “a good walk spoiled” and debated by others as not even being a sport could result in this litany of injuries.

So what are the most common problems suffered by the weekend golfer and how can you treat and prevent them?

BACK PAIN 
It’s been estimated that 80% of Americans will experience back pain at some time in their life. That number becomes even higher when you enjoy golf as an activity. With the average golfer generating torque and swing speeds of 80 to 90 miles an hour and pros well over 110 it is not surprising that the raid generation and sudden stop put significant stress on the lumbar spine. Pre and in-season stretching and core strengthening can be good preventatives. Rest, anti-inflammatories (like Motrin or Aleve) stretching, deep tissue massage and bracing all may be helpful early on. If not responding after a week you may need to see your health care professional.

ELBOW PAIN 
Tennis elbow (outside of the elbow) and golfer’s elbow (medial elbow) are also the bane of the duffer and pro golfer alike. Over use, hitting off mats, too stiff a shaft and improper grip size can lead to these problems.  Stretching, tennis elbow straps, ice, anti inflammatories and injections all have a place in treatment. Sometimes a switch to graphite or a more flexible shaft may be beneficial and could be a reason to consult a golf professional.

WRIST PAIN
Most wrist pain related to golf comes from tendonitis and over use. Taking time off (sorry fellow golfers), ice and anti-inflammatories will cure most cases. If the pain follows striking a root or another object, results in joint swelling or lasts more than a week after treatment than a more serious injury (fracture or ligament tear) is a possibility and a trip to the doctor is more advisable.

KNEE PAIN  
The stiff lead leg is exposed to high stress during weight shift, and while not as common as some of these other problems these injuries often involve ligaments  or meniscus and may need medical attention earlier. Those with arthritis also may see flares during golf season. Bracing and an evaluation of your swing by your golf pro may help. Continue reading