Dr. Greene explains Labral Tears diagnosis & treatment options

ShoreOrtho Sports Performance & Injury Prevention Tips

A Monthly Blog Series
presented by:

Damon A. Greene, MD
Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon
Shore Orthopaedic University Associates
October 2020

LABRAL TEARS
ANATOMY
The hip acts as foundation and pivot point for the entire body joining the upper and lower halves. It is just as important for walking as it is for core strength and supporting the upper body.

The hip is a ball and socket joint. The head of the ball (femoral head) fits into the socket (the acetabulum). If you imagine a cup the labrum is a thick ring of cartilaginous tissue that surrounds the top of the cup. The labrum has many functions from shock absorber but is two main functions are to confer increased stability to the cup and provide semi airtight seal that helps to keep the synovial fluid in the joint which provides lubrication between the femoral head and acetabulum. The labrum has also been shown to have a collection of nerves and sensory organs which can signal pain if the labrum is damaged. The blood supply to the labrum is very limited which unfortunately limits its ability to heal.

SYMPTOMS
Labral tears are difficult to diagnose, partially because of the many muscles and other structures that are near the hip joint. They are often misdiagnosed as common groin strains and it is not uncommon for the diagnosis to be missed for many months after the labrum is torn

Labral tears are common in athletes and occur when the collagen rips. There are many symptoms of a labral tear. The main symptoms are hip and groin pain. However other symptoms include:

  1. Pain
  2. “Catching” feeling in the hip
  3. Decreased strength
  4. Decreased range of motion
  5. Locking of the hip
  6. Stiffness

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Congratulations Dr. Fox on being selected as a Top Podiatrist in NJ!

SELECT SURGEONS BONE & JOINT

Best in New Jersey 

Announcing an elite grouping of the state’s top Orthopedic Surgeons, Neurosurgeons, Plastic Surgeons and Podiatrists across 13 procedure categories. This distinction is based on a number of criteria, including experience, qualifications, surgical volume, results and reputation. Only the top doctors in each category are named to the Select Surgeons Bone & Joint list. Many of the surgeons on this list perform other procedures in addition to those for which they have been recognized.

Ira M. Fox, DPM
Podiatric Surgeon
Shore Orthopaedic University Associates


Specializing in:
Reconstructive and Traumatic Foot and Ankle Surgery, Ankle Joint Replacement

Selection Methodology—Bone & Joint Surgeons
By New Jersey Monthly | August 8, 2019

Select Surgeons takes a 360-degree look at New Jersey’s bone and joint surgeons, reviewing 9 criteria across 13 procedure categories to arrive at the most comprehensive evaluation of leading bone and joint surgeons in the state. Leflein Associates (add link), a locally owned research firm in Ringwood, NJ, was commissioned to conduct the survey. Research was conducted between November 2019 and April 2020.

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Runner’s Knee; Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

ShoreOrtho Sports Performance & Injury Prevention Tips

A monthly series
presented by:

Damon A. Greene, MD
Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon
Shore Orthopaedic University Associates
July 2020


Runner’s Knee

Patellofemoral pain syndrome also called Runners knee refers to pain under and around your kneecap.  Runner’s knee is a term that can describe many medical conditions such as anterior knee pain syndrome, patellofemoral malalignment, and chondromalacia patella. All of these conditions can cause pain around the anterior portion of the knee. Runner’s knee is a common complaint among many athletes from soccer players to jumpers to skiers and of course runners.



Causes

Runner’s knee can happen for many reasons.  From poor alignment of the kneecap, complete or partial dislocation, overuse, tight or weak thigh muscles, flat feet, direct trauma to the knee.  Patellofemoral pain often comes from the softening of the cartilage that lines the underside of the kneecap. The pain can also arise from the strained ligaments and tendons around the knee.
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On-site X-ray allows Shore Orthopaedic to offer an alternative to visiting the ER or Urgent Care for orthopedic issues!

ShoreOrtho Sports Performance
& Injury Prevention Tips


A monthly
series
presented by:
Damon A. Greene, MD
Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon
Shore Orthopaedic University Associates

May 2020

The Covid-19 pandemic has affected and will continue to affect everyone.  As the weather improves and spring turns to summer more of us will be doing outside activities from home projects to bike riding. Orthopedic issues will continue to arise as accidents will unfortunately happen. Fractures and dislocations are serious injuries that require timely treatment. At Shore Orthopedic University Associates, we offer in office diagnostic X-ray and can treat your injury without you ever having to go to the emergency room or urgent care.  Our offices are taking the utmost Covid-19 precautions including a thorough screening process all while maintaining social distancing. As orthopedic surgeons we at Shore Orthopedic University Associates have an obligation to our community. If you or a loved one suffers an accident or is having continued pain, we are here for you. We also offer telehealth visits for urgent and non-urgent issues for all of our patients.

Dr. Greene is a local Ocean City doctor who is a Sports Medicine Fellowship-Trained, Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon.
He specializes in; acute and chronic ligament, tendon, or cartilage injuries to all major joints; primarily shoulders, elbows, knees and hips. He treats fractures surgically when necessary, but performs casting, bracing, and other non-operative treatments such as specialized injection therapies.

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Dr. Greene discusses “UCL TEARS” (Tommy John Procedure)

ShoreOrtho Sports Performance
& Injury Prevention Tips


A monthly
series
presented by:
Damon A. Greene, MD
Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon
Shore Orthopaedic University Associates

March 2020

UCL TEARS (Tommy John Procedure)

Baseball season is right around the corner. So let’s take a few minutes and talk UCL (Ulnar Collateral Ligament) injuries.

UCL injuries are very common for throwing athletes and those that use their upper extremity frequently. There are two types of injuries acute and chronic. An acute injury can occur if too much stress is put on the elbow in one single incident which can cause the ligament to tear. A chronic injury typically occurs from repeated stress on the ligament. This causes the ligament to be stretched, frayed or torn.  The repetitive motion of throwing can cause small micro tears in the ligament which can result in rupture of the ligament. While everyone’s symptoms are different, patients who sustain a UCL injury will experience elbow pain, numbness, and swelling. Elbow instability will also occur. Some patients suffering from an elbow ligament injury may have trouble gripping items with their hands. Athletes will experience a loss of control with throwing and will not be able to complete a throw at full speed or strength. With an acute UCL injury there is typically a pop or tearing sound.

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