Foot & Ankle Surgeon, Dr. Lai offers advice on Ankle Sprains

Ted C. Lai, DPM
Shore Orthopaedic University Associates


 Advice on Ankle Sprains

While in 80 percent of ankle sprains the ligament heals with a brace, rest, ice, compression and elevation, in 20 percent of ankle sprains the ligament does not heal in the correct anatomical position. This happens if the injury is more severe with complete rupture of the ligament and/or you don’t allow it to heal correctly. In this situation, the acute ankle sprain can develop into chronic lateral ankle instability and predisposes other structures to further injuries such as tendonitis and cartilage damage. At that point, with the triad of injuries, surgical repair many times is necessary. With today’s advanced surgical techniques and innovative technologies, recovery time has significantly improved and allows you to get back on your feet earlier. Surgery may be avoided completely by seeing a doctor as soon as the sprain occurs especially if there is swelling, bruising, pain, and difficulty with walking. To avoid ankle sprains, proper footwear is important. Stay away from flimsy shoes and wear rigid-soled sneakers with arch supports. Be cautious when walking or running on uneven terrain such as the beach, curbs, or steps.

Dr. Lai is a fellowship-trained foot and ankle surgeon, specializing in fractures, trauma, reconstructive surgery, ligament and tendon repair, and deformity correction of the foot and ankle. He is board qualified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery and an associate member of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons.

 

 

 

This Little Piggy Has A Bunion

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Ira M. Fox, M.D.

Bunions are those big ugly bumps on the inside of your foot. Sometimes bunions are accompanied by big toes that turn outward toward the small toe.

Most people believe bunions are the result of ill-fitting shoes, but in fact they are hereditary. If you have bunions, look at the feet of your mother, father or grandparents; it is highly likely one of them also has bunions.

The discomfort of bunions can be worsened by shoes, but shoes cannot cause bunions. Treatment consists of accommodation – a change in footwear to fit the bunion – or surgical correction. Accommodation includes wearing more sensible shoes with a more rectangular toe box, or front of the shoe. For those unconcerned with style, orthopedic shoes are available with a toe box specially made for bunions. Padding of the bump also works.  Continue reading

Keeping It Real: The Truth About Bunions

Dr. Fox
Ira M. Fox, D.P.M.

A bunion is the bump on the inside of the big toe.  The complete picture is more complex.  The 1st metatarsal drifts inwards causing the big toe to drift towards the small toe.  There is an increasing space between the 1st and 2nd metatarsal (metatarsus primus varus).  The big toe can rotate (hallux valgus) .

A bunion deformity is a progressive problem.  The longer it exists, the more the great toe moves toward the second toe and the larger the bump becomes.  The earlier the onset, the worse the ultimate deformity. Continue reading

What Is Tendonitis?

Dr. DeMorat
By: Gene J. DeMorat, M.D.

First, we must answer the question – What is a tendon? A tendon is a rope-like structure that connects muscle to bone.  When a muscle contracts the tendon provides an attachment point to assist in movement.  Unfortunately, just like ropes we use to lift and pull objects in everyday life our tendons are susceptible to becoming frayed and damaged. Continue reading