BETTER GOLF THROUGH FITNESS

Ocean City Sure Guide
JUNE 19 – JUNE 25, 2019
Pg. 54

Periodization effective way to prepare for golf season

By: GRADY BROZYNA MSPT, OCS, COMT
Residency & Fellowship Trained in OMT
Shore Orthopaedic Physical Therapy

Grady

Summer is here and I am sure you prepared your golf bag. But how are your rotator cuffs, hip joints and spinal discs?

If you have not been preparing for the past four weeks, then they are not ready for that first tee giant swing to impress the foursome. You are also at prime potential for injury and poor performance. But don’t fret: it’s never too late to ready the body.

Strength and conditioning coaches use what is called periodization to prepare athletes. This breaks down the year into three main categories: Offseason, preseason and in season.

Periodization is designed so the athlete has time to work on recovery and weak areas of performance in the offseason, ramp up to peak form and power during preseason and maximize performance during the season. Golfers are power athletes with swings taking as little as 2 seconds. So golfers should be training for power, which involves strength and speed. And they should be reaching their maximal potential in the heart of summer. That means preseason is spring and offseason winter.

Offseason is when the golfer must take some time and let the repetitive motions stop so the body can heal.

Have a spa day or two to work out the byproducts that build inside the muscles and connective tissue during the season. Sample a yoga class or stretch class to lengthen the muscles that tightened up playing all summer and fall. After  a  few weeks of rest, the remainder of the offseason should be spent working on the skills for which you are weakest.  If you want more distance on your drives, then build strength in your  legs and core. Use exercises such as squats and step-ups, pull-ups and push-ups to build basic strength.

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ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES ARE NOT JUST FOR ATHLETES

Gene J. DeMorat, MD

Weekend warriors’ watch out, rotator cuff injuries happen from simple yard work more often than they do from pitching nine innings

Rotator cuff injuries
The sharp pain in your shoulder that wakes you up when you roll over in the middle of the night might be your rotator cuff or several other things. Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Gene DeMorat of Shore Orthopaedic University Associates, who works with local athletes and was a physician for the U.S. Olympic ski, snowboard and speed skating teams, works with many patients suffering with shoulder pain. “I work with athletes who have shoulder and rotator cuff problems due to injuries related to their sport. But more than athletes, I have weekend warriors who do a lot of damage to their shoulder in their own backyard,” said DeMorat.

Weekend Warriors are frequent patients
Spring is here and it is prime season for rotator cuff injuries according to Dr. DeMorat. “I see so many patients who come in with shoulder pain and it is not because they just pitched nine innings. It is because they have not done any exercise over the winter and there is a nice sunny day and they decide to go for a run even though they have been rather sedentary, not working out over the winter and they find themselves hurting. We see a lot of weekend warriors that come out with the good weather, doing a sudden burst of work, whether it is raking leaves, digging, lifting heavy objects or they decide to do some painting and they find themselves in some pretty significant discomfort.”

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Anthony Vecchione, Senior Health Care Reporter for NJBIZ, interviews Dr. Zabinski.

Terms of engagement

A value-based specialist model drives down costs and improves quality for orthopedic patients

Physicians participating in Horizon BCBSNJ’s Episodes of Care (EOC) program outperformed non-EOC colleagues for the same procedures in outcomes, quality and cost.

The finding is based on an analysis of 2017 data for patients enrolled in Horizon BCBNJ’s EOCs for hip replacement, knee replacement and knee arthroscopy.

EOC is the model used to engage specialists in the Newark-based company’s value-based strategy.

The idea was to drive improved outcomes and patient experience and ultimately reduce the overall cost of care.

Doctors who choose to participate in the program are rewarded for achieving better quality of care, lower costs and a more positive patient experience.

When EOC specialists achieve those triple goals, Horizon shares cost savings that they receive in addition to their fee-for-service reimbursements.

“The idea was to drive improved outcomes and patient experience and ultimately reduce the overall cost of care,” said Lili Brillstein, director of specialty care value based models for Horizon BCBSNJ.

Brillstein said that there has been interest in the program — not only in New Jersey but also all over the country.

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KNEE REPLACEMENT GIVES PATIENTS A PAIN-FREE LIFE

Shore Medical Center:

ADVANCED SPINE AND ORTHOPEDIC INSTITUTE

“Shore Healthy Living” Newsletter

February 13, 2019

Knee replacement surgeries are a daily occurrence for Dr. Stephen Zabinski and his fellow orthopedic surgeons at Shore Orthopaedic University Associates (SOUA) in Somers Point. “Knees are by far the most common of all joints that are replaced,” said Dr. Zabinski who has been performing knee replacement surgery for more than 20 years.  “Knees are also the joint most commonly affected by osteoarthritis. They are also the most subjective to sports injury and most affected by weight. Those factors can wear the knees away.”

Most patients will visit SOUA with complaints of discomfort from osteoarthritis, though there are many forms of arthritis that negatively impact joints and bones. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis in the knee. It is a degenerative, “wear-and-tear” type of arthritis where the cartilage gradually wears away. It occurs most often in people age 50 and older, but may occur in younger people as well, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Dr. Zabinski added that genetics also plays a factor and said people who tend to sit cross-legged as they eat, or kneel often may have significant discomfort in their knee simply because they are putting a lot of additional stress on the knee itself.

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