Dr. Greene discusses “Surfers Shoulder”

ShoreOrtho Sports Performance
& Injury Prevention Tips


A monthly
series
presented by:
Damon A. Greene, MD
Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon
Shore Orthopaedic University Associates

November 2019

“Surfers Shoulder” also known as Shoulder Impingement is a common overuse injury of the shoulder.

When we paddle we use the front of our shoulder the pectoralis major, pectoralis minor and anterior aspect of our deltoid. We also strengthen shoulder elevators the trapezuim and levator scapula among others. This causes a net upward and anterior directed force across our shoulder. This then leads to impingement of the rotator cuff on the acromion (the roof of the shoulder).  Intern the tissue around the rotator cuff becomes inflamed which then will lead to bursitis.

If left unaddressed scar tissue can form in the capsule causing a loss of a range of motion and chronic shoulder pain and ultimately rotator cuff tears. In order to prevent this proper paddling technique is crucial. Secondly learning to activate the posterior and inferior aspects of our shoulders while preforming activities will help keep us paddling stronger and out of pain.

While there are many different exercises that can achieve this, one of my favorites is an exercise called Wall Angels. 


To begin, plant yourself against a nice, roomy wall space. Elbows start at a 90 degree bend, with the elbows parallel to the ground. Hips, spine, shoulder blades…all against the wall! To get to the stretch-and-strengthen part – although you might already feel some tension while holding the arms at 90 degrees – begin to straighten the arms directly overhead, trying to at least keep the elbows sliding up against the wall. As you get stronger and looser, maybe the forearms and back of the hands will be able to stay in contact with the wall, as well.

 

Dr. Greene is a Sports Medicine Fellowship-Trained, Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon.
He specializes in; acute and chronic ligament, tendon, or cartilage injuries to all major joints; primarily shoulders, elbows, knees and hips. He treats fractures surgically when necessary, but performs casting, bracing, and other non-operative treatments such as specialized injection therapies.

 

Thank you Dr. Lai! If they gave more stars I’d give them on this review

I waited to write this review until my full year recovery.
I was a 55 year old patient with reconstructive surgery on 3 metatarsals. They were broken in a multitude of places. Adding to this my bones mended before surgery due to the fact that my original X-rays from the podiatrist appeared less complicated. Dr. Lai who has a pleasant demeanor took additional X-rays because I wasn’t mending properly. So he actually had to break and reset my metatarsals. I consider myself fortunate to have had such an outstanding surgeon. Dr. Lai was also top notch with my stitches. You can barely see them. I have no pain a year later and I walk as part of my exercise and enjoyment in my life. If they gave more stars I’d give them on this review. Thank you Dr. Lai and your entire surgical staff!
Cecilia Murphy
– Wildwood, NJ

Dr. Greene discusses a common surfing injury

ShoreOrtho Sports Performance
& Injury Prevention Tips


A monthly
series
presented by:
Damon A. Greene, MD
Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon
Shore Orthopaedic University Associates

October 2019

It’s finally fall and time for surfing season especially here in South Jersey.

So let’s discuss a surfing injury that commonly gets overlooked the “Hips Flexors”. When we are surfing the front foot and hip rotate forward this puts stress across the spine, hip, knees and even ankles. The back foot turns out because the gluteal muscles (buttock muscles) contract and shorten rotating the back hip out. This means that unless we stretch and strengthen to our hip flexors, we are setting ourselves up for other injuries and limiting our ability to enjoy the waves. One stretch that I like is called the Lizard. This stretch predominately targets the hip flexors but also targets the groin and glutes. Draw one foot to the outside of your arms and place both hands flat on the ground. Bring your forearms to the floor or as far as your body allows. Your back leg stays off the ground. Hold the stretch for approximately 30 seconds and repeat.

 

 

 

Community Talk | Tuesday November 5, 2019 6:00-6:45pm

Joint Pain, Tried Everything, Let’s TALK!

Register for this event at: ShoreOrtho.eventbrite.com

Greate Bay Racquet & Fitness in cooperation with
Shore Orthopaedic University Associates presents:
Community Orthopaedic Lecture Series | Evening Session 
An opportunity to “Ask The Expert”

Charles N. Krome, DO, Board Certified Sports Medicine

– Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) Therapy
 Stem Cell Therapy

Join Us for a Question & Answer Session:
Non-Surgical Options for Joint Pain and Arthritis
“What is Stem Cell Treatment & (PRP) Platelet Rich Plasma Therapy?”

Greate Bay Racquet & Fitness
90 Mays Landing Road, Somers Point, NJ 08244
– This is a FREE event, open to the community
(Greate Bay membership not required)
– Limited Seating
– Refreshments Served

For more information contact:
Greate Bay Racquet & Fitness – 609-926-9550  or
Shore Orthopaedic – 609-927-1991 ext. 171