Better Golf through fitness: Shore Orthopaedic’s Physical Therapist LJ Georgetti, DPT

“Its all In The Hips” By Larry Justin “LJ” Georgetti, DPT

Any aging golfer can count on one of his/her friend’s bailing on an eight o-clock tee time due to “back pain”. Range of motion and strength of the whole body are essential when building a strong foundation to a healthy golf swing. I believe that the abnormalities in swing mechanics and mobility limitations in the hips/spine will cause restrictions in how one develops force in the golf swing.  These abnormalities over time will result in dysfunction and eventually pain.

The golf swing has many variables, as does the human body. However, one thing remains consistent throughout all golf swings: energy must be delivered to a stationary golf ball in order to move it a desired distance. In the most efficient swings, energy is generated by the lower extremities via the ground. How this energy is gained, stored and eventually transmitted are exactly where the variables begin to differentiate between professional and recreational golfers. A golfer utilizes his/her lower extremity to generate force through the ground and eventually to the ball at impact. It is worth noting that the musculature surrounding the hips, known as the “glutes”, are the strongest in the body. These are the ones responsible for getting us up out of a chair and keeping us erect when walking. Problems arise when we do not train and utilize these muscles appropriately. As my colleague, Chris Hanson, previously discussed, the hip and the lumbar spine are closely related in the golf swing. If dysfunction arises in one, the other will suffer.

Continue reading

Hip Mobility and the Golf Swing

By Christopher C. Hanson, PT, MPT, DMT, OCS, FAAOMPT

 

Most golfers are weekend warriors and if there is extra time in anyone’s schedule for golf activities, more times than not this is allocated to swing training.  As the last few articles have discussed, physical fitness is equally important.  In order to have a world class swing, the function of one’s musculoskeletal system also needs to be equipped. Golf is a sport that requires strength, power, coordination and mobility; no one of these is more important than the other. This weekly dive into the physical care of a golfer’s body will discuss the importance of hip mobility and stability in all golfers.

In the golf community the importance of spinal mobility and strength is well documented. There have been numerous social media campaigns since the start of this golf season showing new creative ways to improve spinal mobility and strength.  However, absent from these posts have been ways to improve hip strength and mobility; negating altogether the connection between the hip and the spine.

The hip and the spine are intricately related. If one has movement issues in one area, it can transmit increased forces along the kinetic (movement) chain.  In the presence of hip mobility issues the body increases motion in other joints.  The body is almost too good at this compensation and creating more (too much) movement in order to allow someone to function in a way that seems correct.  In the presence of limited hip mobility there may be an excessive forces through the lumbar spine. This can happen at different points in the swing.  Limited hip mobility can create issues in the back swing, during the initiation of swing and during the follow through. This also relates to other sporting activities as well.

Continue reading

Thank you Dr. Barrett!

Office Visit – I had an appointment to see Dr. Barrett to have a possible broken finger checked. Everyone in the office was courteous and helpful both times I was there. When you are not feeling well it means a lot to know others care and that they are true professionals.

Thank you!
Clinton A. Cape May, NJ

Golf Injuries to the Wrist and Hand

Mark Walsh PT, DPT, MS, CHT
Titleist Performance Institute Certified
Shore Orthopaedic Physical Therapy

Did you know that of all the sports the most injuries to the hand and wrist occur in golf?

Hand injuries occur in about 10% of professional and 20% in the amateur golfers. The incidence may be explained by the anatomic and mechanical complexity of the wrist and hand. Most of the injuries occur in the lead wrist and hand associated with overuse, golf swing faults and mechanics and trauma.

Overuse injuries are primarily tendonitis or tenosynovitis such as deQuervains tenosynovitis (inflammation of tendons on the thumb side of the wrist). Overuse injuries often occur in the amateur at the beginning of the golf season, when the golfer is not appropriately physically prepared to strike the golf ball. For example, as the golf season approaches it’s off to the driving range hitting a large bucket of balls one after another without appropriate warm up and rest between swings. Watch a professional warm up hitting golf balls notice, that between each swing, they stop, analyze the ball flight, divot etc. and discuss it with their caddy or coach.  The take home message is that the amateur hits too many golf balls to quickly and too often. Overuse also occurs due to a lack of physical conditioning for their entire body, not just the upper extremity. The power and the ability to strike the golf ball correctly comes from the use of the powerful core and lower extremity muscles. If the lower body does not initiate the swing sequence correctly this can cause changes in the upper body swing mechanics placing the wrist and hand at risk. Swing faults of “Casting, Scooping, Chicken Winging and Over the Top” can contribute to wrist and hand injuries.

Continue reading